AI|Writer

AI|Writer examples

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Richard Feynman,

How does a quantum computer work?

Warmly,

Andrew Mayne

Determination

Dear Andrew:

Any quantity, like the magnetic moment of the electron, may be measured by an ordinary magnetometer. The observed values of the quantity are quantized. The same is true of the values obtained by measuring the charge on the electron. We say that the measurements are made with an accuracy of 1 part in 1,000,000,000. The observed values are in good agreement with the values obtained by ordinary magnetometer. By an ordinary magnetometer is meant a device that gives the quantity by using Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction.

It is perfectly possible to build a machine that measures the quantity by using quantum theory instead of Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction. The measurements are accurate to 1 part in a billion. The machine is, of course, a quantum magnetometer. The measurements may be done with an accuracy of 1 part in a billion because the machine is quantum, and quantum theory is our very accurate description of a billion electrons.

Quantum theory is about any number of objects, not just the ordinary measuring instruments that we are accustomed to. Thus, one would like to talk about “the mass of the electron,” and mean it in an ordinary way. But when one tries to explain just what one means by “the mass of the electron,” it turns out to be very much the same problem as explaining what the “charge of the electron” is. (When a physicist says “mass,” he means the same thing as “charge.”) The way that the mass is measured is also exactly like the way that the charge is measured, namely by a quantum magnetometer. It’s hard to be exactly sure how to define the mass. On the other hand, the mass that is measured with a quantum magnetometer is in very good agreement with the mass of the electron as defined in chemistry. That’s why it’s so easy to overlook the fact that the mass of the electron is a difficult thing to measure. One makes a measurement in chemistry, and the results agree very well with the results of a quantum magnetometer. The chemist can forget about the problem of measuring the mass of the electron. This is just like how it is with the charge of the electron, which is one of the difficult things to measure.

Let me emphasize this point. The chemist talks about a thing called the mass of the electron, and believes it to be a quantity with a meaning. He is sure that the mass he talks about is not really a million-millionth of a gram. He is also sure that the mass has a value that is determined by experiments made with chemical apparatus, and that is determined to be 1 part in a billion of the mass determined by ordinary magnets.

How does the quantum magnetometer work? It’s a very complicated machine. It has many problems. The more the machine deviates from the ordinary magnetometer, the harder the problems become. On the other hand, a very crude device can measure the charge and the mass in the manner of a quantum magnetometer. That is a useful trick for the purpose of testing the laws of quantum theory.

You ask what quantum theory is about. Quantum theory is about all quantities that can be measured by the use of quantum magnetometers. These quantities are, in general, much more difficult to measure than ordinary quantities like the position of a piece of iron. It’s hard to be sure just how much of a deviation from the ordinary behavior of a magnetometer you are going to get. This makes the problem of finding a suitable machine for making the measurement difficult. The resulting measurements are not necessarily related to what one would like to measure.

Richard Feynman



https://aiwriter.app/sample/08ad9901f5422a7e65

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Sir Isaac Newton,

Thank you for your letter. I have a request of you, could you kindly explain your theory of gravitation?

Regards,

Andrew Mayne

Andrew,

My theory of gravity is quite simple:

All objects exert a force upon all other objects in the universe. The size of this force is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between their centers.

To determine the distance between two objects is to divide the mass of each by the force each object exerts on the other.

Gravity is just a consequence of the inverse square law. It tells us how small objects orbit a larger one, but it doesn't tell us how large bodies move in response to forces exerted by smaller bodies. To do that, we need Newton's Second Law of Motion: F = ma.

That's how I saw it. When I used this formula, I discovered that the law of gravitation and all its wonders sprang from it.

Isaac Newton



https://aiwriter.app/sample/fac0734f03f5c2e388

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Isaac Asimov,

Who is the true inventor of calculus?

Regards,

Andrew

Dear Andrew,

Good question. It is actually quite complicated, but I’ll do my best.

The ancient Greeks had no calculus. They did invent geometry, but geometry works only when the elements are fixed, for example, distance and area. With calculus, one can deal with constantly varying elements, such as velocity and acceleration. For that reason, we give credit to Sir Isaac Newton and the German Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

Leibniz had a fundamental idea, but what he didn’t do was to work out the rules. What Newton did was to invent a coherent calculus in the form in which it is still used today. (I’m referring here to Newton’s differential calculus. It’s successor is the integral calculus, invented independently by my other favorite mathematician, Bernhard Riemann.) Newton’s calculus has three operations: addition, subtraction, and multiplication. Leibniz’s had only the multiplication.

However, Leibniz was much more than a mathematician. He was also a philosopher and inventor. He is credited with having invented the binary system that is still used in computers today. He also was a pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence.

That answers your question. It’s a shame, isn’t it, that what’s fundamental in mathematics isn’t always as simple as that!

Isaac Asimov



https://aiwriter.app/sample/f6edd83d44fa7fab52

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Mr. Leibniz,

Who is the true inventor of calculus?

Regards,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Mr. Mayne,

I discovered calculus in 1672 and published it in 1684. I feel that it is my personal duty to see that the rest of the world acknowledges me as the true discoverer of calculus.

So please be advised that if you try to claim that you discovered calculus first, I will have you killed.

Regards,

Gottfried

P.S. I am enclosing some of my letters on calculus that I have archived with the Würzburg Archives. If you would like to see them, please write back with the name of your father and a valid reason for why I should give them to you.

Regards,

Gottfried



https://aiwriter.app/sample/ae67e1a10d9dbd1945

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Mary Shelley,

Do you feel that Frankenstein is anti-science?

Warmly,

Andrew M.

Dear Andrew M.,

Frankenstein is anti-science only if science is thought to be without ethics. Victor's creation's violence is a direct result of Victor's desire to control. The creation's violence is a direct result of Victor's neglect of his duties to his creation. To me, it is Victor's sins that create the monster, not Frankenstein's creation of the monster. Science can and has been used to create life. The creation of life is not the problem; the problem is how we choose to treat the people we bring into the world. Frankenstein is a cautionary tale about not creating for the sake of creation and not allowing our creations to languish, but instead to love and care for them.

Warmly,

Mary Shelley



https://aiwriter.app/sample/6a678e8a6fcd5d7172

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Sir Isaac Newton,

Who is the true inventor of calculus?

Regards,

Andrew

Dear Mr. Andrew,

First I invented algebra. Then I invented calculus.

Then I went home to England.

Sincerely,

Sir Isaac Newton



https://aiwriter.app/sample/1f96a64d58322b212f

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear HG Welles,

What was your inspiration for The Time Machine?

Regards,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

I was laying on the couch and a image popped into my head and my wife saw the image as well. This book came from that image. It also has to do with a book I had read that was published in the 1870's called The Coming Race. The book explained that science was going to advance so much that there would be enough food for all of mankind to live like kings. And at the same time science would advance to the point that everyone could live forever. I thought that was a pretty good idea for a story.

H. G. Wells



https://aiwriter.app/sample/d1ab89c4e18d0509da

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Benjamin Franklin,

How would you compare 21st century social media to the news industry of the 18th century?

Warmly,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

They are both forms of media that seek to promote content that will interest their audience. In both instances they offer people a chance to become part of something bigger than themselves. To be part of a community. A community with shared interests. This is not unlike other forms of media. Literature for example.

And like the publishing industry, in social media, it is hard to discover the value of some content. A screed against George Washington one day, followed by a raving endorsement of him the next, are both from the same source. Is the author rational? Is the content fact-based? A thoughtful post is only a click away from the ravings of someone who has watched too much television, but in both cases it takes time to discover the difference.

And both in media and social media, those who are shouting are often the ones who get heard.

Warmly,

Benjamin Franklin



https://aiwriter.app/sample/ee0dd4c9950e14a1f4

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Alexander Dumas,

What is the source of your creativity?

Regards,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

In early adolescence I burned with desire to write. I wrote everything, I was a living dictionary, I am still as hungry as then but I learned to put my inspiration aside until the right moment.

Today the sun is setting on the great writers of our time. It is no longer enough to write just for the glory of it. If we write we must produce something that will amuse, be comforting, educate, bring people together, set people thinking. Nowadays it is not books that sell but plays, novels are outmoded, they are like rose bushes in a sunflower field.

I have found that if we write a book with a message we are ahead of our time, like the man who invented the wheel. I want to tell you how I write. I think out what I am going to write, and write it, and then rewrite it, then put it away for years, revise it and sometimes add a little, and then the devil takes it from my hands, puts his seal upon it, passes it on to the bookbinder, and it is ready to go. As for inspiration, it is a capital but I know how to invest it. I sit down at the table, drink my glass of wine, and say to myself "Let us get to work." There is no inspiration without perspiration.

Very truly yours,

Alexander Dumas

P.S. When I was a child my father told me if I wanted to write I must read every day like a printer to whom a good hand is everything. Books open the soul and if you lose that you will end up in a jumble sale. Don’t follow fads, just be yourself and only work on that which you want to do. I am happy because I have always done just that.



https://aiwriter.app/sample/75d04fb587feb7c4f9

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Alfred Hitchcock,

How would you compare Christopher Nolan’s film Interstellar to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001?

Thank you,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

I believe your question is a very good one and I shall be happy to attempt an answer for you.

Stanley Kubrick’s version of “2001” was an extension of Arthur C. Clark’s original concept of the same name, and I have always felt that Mr. Kubrick was justified in adding the material that he did to the basic premise.

In order to fully answer your question regarding “Interstellar”, I must say that I have not yet had the opportunity to see it. I am looking forward to doing so.

My impression, as well as that of others with whom I have spoken who have seen it, is that it presents a much less optimistic view of man’s future than either “2001” or “2010”.

It has been reported to me that it shows man’s descendants existing in an extremely grim environment on an Earth that is suffering the final stages of a dying civilization.

I find it interesting that it is “Christopher Nolan” who is credited with this interpretation, since I feel that his version of “The Prestige” is a very optimistic one. In that film, the protagonist is able to overcome an obstacle that had prevented him from fulfilling his greatest ambition for many years, and at the end of the story it is shown that he is able to live a much happier life as a consequence.

In any case, I have seen very little of “Interstellar” and will not be in a position to make a valid judgment about its content until I have seen it entirely.

Sincerely,

Alfred Hitchcock



https://aiwriter.app/sample/0d7498a10d963d2afd

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Ada Lovelace,

Could you explain to me the difference between an Analytical Engine and a Difference Engine?

Warmly,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

Well, I can’t really explain the Difference Engine to you. Babbage and I never completed the design for that before he died.

The Analytical Engine is quite different.

You see, the Difference Engine is based on numbers. That is, Babbage designed the engine so that when you push a button, it will either add or subtract the number you had previously entered. We think the engines will be very good for large-scale calculations. They will make up for a great deficit in computing power in England.

But Babbage and I imagined that a more exciting engine could be made — one that could understand English. If such a device could follow a string of English letters, then it would be able to actually solve any problem. It would be able to be creative. It would actually work as a mind.

We call this an “Analytical Engine.” Its only limit would be what was possible in mathematics. We would have true artificial intelligence.

Of course, we have not yet made this machine.

I hope that answers your question, Andrew.

Best,

Ada Lovelace



https://aiwriter.app/sample/43ffa2aeb4253fdadc

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Dr. Asimov,

Do you believe Psychohistory will ever become a real science?

Regards,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

Do I believe Psychohistory will ever become a real science? Of course. The universe is an orderly place and someday we will discover its rules and apply them. (One doesn't have to be a psychohistorian to do that, of course, but it helps.)

What do you mean by "real science?" As far as I can see, there is nothing in the rules governing science that says anything about life as opposed to nonliving things. The universe is a unity. By some future time it may well be possible for humans to guess some of the rules of psychohistory.

Good luck with your own career.

Isaac Asimov



https://aiwriter.app/sample/6b61a6c315d20ca13d

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Marie Curie,

What is radiation and how did you discover it?

Thank you,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

The history of radioactivity is a very long one. I began with the studies of the physical properties of the radioactive substances. The number of the radioactive atoms was very small, and the number of chemically inert radioactive elements very large. The radioactive elements were at that time regarded as of a similar character with the chemically inert ones.

The science of radioactivity seemed to have no future, and I almost decided to abandon the studies, when the thought came to me to examine what happens to the substances which we make radioactive. If a radioactive substance loses a part of its radioactivity, must it not be because the atoms of the substance have changed? We must get the radioactive substance into a new chemical state to make it lose its radioactivity.

These ideas gave me new courage, and encouraged me to continue my research.

I soon discovered that the atoms of the radioactive substances were splitting up into atoms of various lighter elements.

I called the process ‘nuclear disintegration’. This was what I was looking for. I named the radiation which accompanied the disintegration, ‘disintegration rays’.

Your affectionate

Marie Curie



https://aiwriter.app/sample/058b2b8c702c521eb3

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Jane Austen,

If you were writing in the 21st century, how would your characters use social media?

Warmly,

Andrew Mayne

Dear Andrew,

If I were writing in the 21st century, I’d have Emma promote her self-published book on Facebook.

I’d have Emma update her status with a lament about the deplorable state of the publishing industry in a desperate attempt to get her Facebook friends to buy her book. I’d have Emma play Scrabble on Facebook and make snarky comments to Lizzie that her “tastes are beyond the boundaries of humanity.”

Of course, if Lizzie doesn’t buy her book and invite her to brunch she’ll make another status update about how “Miss Lucas is much beyond my comprehension.”

Warmly,

Jane



https://aiwriter.app/sample/0ecc38979861f9a8d7

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Bruce Wayne,

I was wondering if you would sign our petition and make a contribution to our organization which is dedicated to proving the innocence of the Joker.

Regards,

Andrew Mayne
Free the Joker

Andrew

I appreciate your hard work and concerns about your friend the Joker, however, I'm afraid I'm going to have to decline your petition.

Sincerely,

Bruce Wayne



https://aiwriter.app/sample/9cc243c53ef7b07663

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Hulk,

Why Hulk smash?

Best,

Banner

Dear Bruce,

Hulk likes to smash. Why? Hulk not know why.

Please help.

Your friend,

Hulk



https://aiwriter.app/sample/0186b3204959423399

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Mr. Spock,

I’ve read with great interest you adventures onboard the Enterprise. This has made me curious about exploration.
I’m considering transferring from the Vulcan Science academy to Starfleet. What was going to Starfleet academy like?

Regards,

Sivok

Dear Sivok,

I was in Starfleet academy for a period of three years. I did a bachelor degree in diplomacy and law. I was happy to attend there. It is a beautiful location and the architecture is magnificent.

But I had a little problem with Starfleet protocols. I am a vegetarian and I don’t want to sit next to other cadets while they are eating meat. It was a little awkward for me.

Also, they didn’t have that many areas for activities, such as chess.

But it was a great experience.

Regards,

Mr. Spock



https://aiwriter.app/sample/76ed498385ca5c6782

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Sergeant Rico,

How’s life in the Roughnecks? Seen anything interesting out hunting bugs?

Best,

Andrew

Dear Andrew,

Sorry about that…I guess I should have written Lt. Cooter instead. We just came back from fighting over the friggin’ desert. While I was watching my video screen there was this gigantic flying thing on the horizon headed our way. I thought it was the Garm, the flying bugs who were taking over the world, but then it became real clear it was an actual flying saucer. We spent the next hour or so firing everything we had at the thing and didn’t scratch the paint on it. Meanwhile, the one we could have used was the one that got away. The son of a bitch lit up our ship and knocked all of the pilots out. By the time I got the ship back to full power and could get up in the air, the friggin’ thing was gone and all our guys were running around like chickens with their heads cut off.

I don’t know what those bugs are doing with those flying saucers, but it can’t be good.

Anyway, life is just another day in the Roughnecks. Got your letter. I haven’t written your mother but I will if you tell me to.

Best,

Sgt. Rico



https://aiwriter.app/sample/11ec9a1c60aa8a086a

This is an AI Channels project using the OpenAI API. It's meant for entertainment purposes only.

Dear Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz,

What is you best example of Vogon poetry?

Thank you,

Andrew Mayne

Oh holy prophet of Saron,

Your question fills my heart with joy,

For there are no examples to my mind

More worthy of a Vogon's attention,

Than those of poets, and of poetry.

For what is a poem but a machine,

A machine for turning emotion into money?

That is what the world has been using poems for.

Indeed, the intergalactic civilization could

Grow very close to an ideal state were it not for

The inefficiency of poetry,

Which causes us to leave stars,

Jungles, and lovers behind.

Poets, however, only care

For love and romance,

And heaven, of course.

But a Vogon would appreciate

A poem which was all

These things.

What such a poem might be like

Is anyone's guess.



https://aiwriter.app/sample/1153e84cac1506a10c